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A state magistrate judge in New Orleans has a conflict of interest when he sets bail for criminal defendants because bail fees help fund court operations, a federal appeals court said Thursday ? the second time in a week it has found such a conflict in New Orleans courts.

The ruling was in response to an appeal filed by Orleans Parish Criminal District Court Magistrate Judge Harry Cantrell ? often the first court official to preside over a newly arrested defendant’s case, and the one who initially sets bond.

A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal rejected Cantrell’s appeal and upheld a lower court finding that there was a conflict because fees collected as part of bail go to a judicial expense fund.

The lower court’s ruling came in response to a lawsuit filed by two state criminal defendants, one of whom was jailed for two weeks until money for a bail bond was raised, and another who was never able to come up with the money and stayed in jail for a month.

“Because he must manage his chambers to perform the judicial tasks the voters elected him to do, Judge Cantrell has a direct and personal interest in the fiscal health of the public institution that benefits from the fees his court generates and that he also helps allocate,” Judge Gregg Costa wrote for the appeals panel. The bond fees, the opinion said, contribute between 20% and 25% of the amount spent by the court in recent years.

Last Friday, a separate 5th Circuit panel said the district court judges who hear cases and preside over trials have a conflict of interest when they are faced with deciding whether some defendants are able to pay fines and fees that partially fund their court’s expenses. That decision was in response to a lawsuit filed by criminal defendants who accused the New Orleans-based court of operating what amounted to a debtors’ prison.



K-Global @ SiliconValley introduces Korea’s competitive ICT / SW technologies and companies to the local industry in the US.

This event was designed as a forum to present trends in the field of information and communication technology, aiming to provide strategic and financial partnerships between Korea and the US, in the area of future innovation.

This event highlights US innovation technology trends centered on Silicon Valley since 2012, and provides Korean Tech companies with advanced R&D direction, and local business/export. It has become the largest Korea-US exchange event in Korea.

Every year, high-level officials of the Korean government visit the event to understand new technology trends between the US and the ROK, and to establish a policy direction for the future.

This year’s K-Global @ SiliconValley theme is “Future is on 5G”. Related to the 5G theme, we are planning to explore 3 trends which have been sub-categorized (5G Core, 5G Infra, 5G+) and 4 programs (ICT Forum, Partnership Expo, K-Pitch, International Pitch).

First, the ICT Forum will provide in-depth discussions on collaboration and future 5G prospects and opportunities for global business and academia experts. At the exhibition, the 5G-related SMEs in Korea will take part in introducing their products and technology to business people in Silicon Valley. In addition, K-Pitch will be able to show Korea’s innovative Small Giants, who will lead the future 5G global ecosystem, and will also participate in the pitching of national start-ups that have entered the Silicon Valley through a separate international pitch.

K-GLOBAL is looking forward to seeing the future of 5G and becoming a good place to experience the technological power of Korea’s innovative companies.

https://kglobal.tech/introduction/




South Africa’s Equality Court on Wednesday restricted the display of the country’s old apartheid-era flag, ruling that its gratuitous use amounts to hate speech and racial discrimination.

Judge Phineas Mojapelo said the ruling was not a complete ban, saying use of the flag is protected by law for artistic, academic, journalistic or other purposes deemed in the public interest.

The judge criticized those who continued to wave the apartheid-era flag.

“Those who display the old flag choose deliberately to not only display the old flag, but also consciously and deliberately choose to not display the new, multiracial flag,” said Mojapelo. “They choose oppression over liberation.”

He said those who publicly display the flag should not be arrested, but should face deterrents such as fines or terms of community service.

The orange, white and blue flag of South Africa’s previous white-minority regime, which enforced the system of racial discrimination known as apartheid, was replaced by a new flag when the country achieved majority-rule democracy in 1994.

However, some conservatives and right-wing groups continued to display the apartheid-era flag, notably at political gatherings or sometimes during rugby matches.



Lawyers for a Maryland man whose murder conviction was chronicled in the hit podcast "Serial" are asking the Supreme Court to step into the case.

Lawyers for defendant Adnan Syed say in court papers Monday that the justices should order a new trial for Syed and reverse a Maryland court ruling against him. Syed claims his trial lawyer violated his constitutional right to competent representation because she failed to investigate an alibi witness.

Syed is serving a life sentence after he was convicted in 2000 of strangling 17-year-old Hae Min Lee and burying her body in a Baltimore park. Syed and Lee were high-school classmates who had dated.

In its debut 2014 season, the "Serial" podcast shined a spotlight on the case that led to renewed court proceedings.




The lawyer for U.S. rapper A$AP Rocky says he is “disappointed” by the decision of a Stockholm court to find his client guilty of assault for his role in a June 30 street brawl in the city.

Slobodan Jovicic says he had hoped for a “complete acquittal.”

Jovicic told reporters that it was too early to say whether the ruling from the Stockholm District Court will be appealed.

A Swedish court that found American rapper A$AP Rocky guilty of assault for his role in a June 30 street brawl in Stockholm says he and his two bodyguards “assaulted the victim by hitting and kicking him as he lay on the ground.”

During the trial, prosecutors played video footage that showed the rapper, whose real name is Rakim Mayers, throwing a young man to the ground.

Per Lennerbrant, the presiding judge, told a news conference that “the evidence in the case has been complex.”

The victim, 19-year-old Mustafa Jafari, was struck in the back of the head with a bottle but “it could not be established by whom,” he said, adding that “this has affected the assessment of the seriousness of the crime.”

The three avoided prison sentences. They were given conditional sentences and also ordered to a pay a total of 12,500 kronor ($1,307) in compensation.


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